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Adam Waldron-Blain is a famous artist in Edmonton. More »

hfml:

catdad:

Dolly Parton - Stairway To Heaven (Live)

Oh my god.

yass gawd

ok

(previously)

I Like:

On “The Mezzanine”, chapter seven, by Nicholson Baker

I have been leant a couple of books lately; this one was given to me after a conversation about my work with Kristy Trinier, a discussion about my particular interests in little details and daily rituals. But it is taking me a surprising time to read.

I am not in the habit of reading from books. I think it is a skill that I lost in university, probably during a course on early 20th-century British literature that was the least enjoyable of the English courses that I took, although I periodically think about revisiting the texts that I didn’t pay enough attention to. It was a trade I made subconsciously as I learned about my abilities to talk about things I didn’t actually know about. I wrote part of the final on a book I had not read (The Well of Loneliness) and got a reasonable grade for it, probably a B+.

This means that when I am putting my day together, this book doesn’t immediately spring to mind. Nonetheless, when I picked it up today, on a quiet and slightly hazy summer evening after a couple of loud ones, feeling a somewhat tired but positive kind of specificity about myself, I was really happy to remember with an incredible clarity the words that I had left off on. Without even remembering the page number, I found my way to the end of the right chapter, just by the last sentence of:

Will the universe of all possible things I could be reminded of ever be mostly an adult universe? I hope so—indeed, if I could locate the precise moment in my past when I conclusively became an adult, a few simple calculations would determine how many years it will be before I reach this new stage of life: the end of the rule of nostalgia, the beginning of my true Majority. And, luckily, I can remember the very day that my life as an adult began.

Less expected, although foreshadowed in an earlier chapter, was that chapter seven would explain how this occurred on the day that the narrator learned that it was possible to apply deodorant without taking off his shirt. The chapter ends with him getting a cup of coffee from the really good place on his way to work (to go though, I don’t hold with that).

The other reason that I am reading this slowly is because I have a very strong tendency to stop in these places. I feel that I am understanding the point of chapters better than I ever had before. Here we are with the coffee only a few minutes later and I look forward to enjoying this moment of simultaneous completeness and continuity for maybe several days before I read the next chapter.

This August I will be in residence at John Snow House in Calgary to work on my podcast.

If you want to come talk about something on it during that time let me know.

Also: here is an article about what kind of spatula you should buy.

This August I will be in residence at John Snow House in Calgary to work on my podcast.

If you want to come talk about something on it during that time let me know.

Also: here is an article about what kind of spatula you should buy.

Adam Waldron-Blain is one of the organizers of Manhunter, hybrid game of hide-and-go-seek and tag.

I think it’s from here

Adam Waldron-Blain is one of the organizers of Manhunter, hybrid game of hide-and-go-seek and tag.

I think it’s from here

But the Tamarians’ version of allegory, if that’s indeed the right name for it, cuts both ways. On the one hand, it fetishizes myth in the manner of allegory, but on the other hand it musters that myth in the interest of serious sociopolitical action, as evidenced by Dathon’s willingness literally to die in the name of myth. So Benjamin’s concerns about the abandonment of the present don’t seem to apply to the Tamarian situation, offering further doubt that allegory is the best way to describe their communication process.

A “Star Trek” Episode Shows the Next Phase of Human Communication

sttngfashion:

A very cool piece on Darmok!

h/t @52stations

(via sstabhmontown)

This is pretty great.

This week I had a few conversations about how I understand ritual to function, kinds of magic, especially swearing of oaths. I think this is close in some ways, and also is close to the reasons I love games.

latitude53:

We’re excited to announce our summer off-site project facilitated by New-York state-based Irish curator Paul O’Neill: Our Day Will Come will take place in The Quarters downtown starting in July.

The project will continue over the next year, linked by zines as well as participatory workshops. We’ll be announcing lots more details soon—in the mean time, read a little bit about our plans on our website.

latitude53:

We’re excited to announce our summer off-site project facilitated by New-York state-based Irish curator Paul O’Neill: Our Day Will Come will take place in The Quarters downtown starting in July.

The project will continue over the next year, linked by zines as well as participatory workshops. We’ll be announcing lots more details soon—in the mean time, read a little bit about our plans on our website.

> Future Station

I am looking forward to this show quite a lot actually.

I had a really nice talk with Kristy this past weekend about some submerged themes in my work that has given me some things to think about.

> Min-Maxing Criticism: On Capitalism and Leveling Up

sexartandpolitics:

clockworkworlds:

image

Stephen Beirne has written a polemic you should read. The claim he makes is that game design archetype of “leveling up” reflects the ideology of capitalism “as narrated by economic exchanges of labour and wealth.” More broadly, Beirne draws a line (not just a…

To read

why would anyone try to write about this stuff and not talk about Gary Gygax it’s all there in 1974: explicit linkage of points to gold in the fiction, the general store as a model, medievalism vs the wild west, yuppie entrepreneurship, intellectual property lawsuits.

thejogging:

Charlotte Free’s New York Haul - Jogging - Artist Video Projects - MOCAtv, 2014

> One Step Forward, Two Steps Back? Thoughts about the Donelle Woolford Debate

raymondboisjoly:

Coco Fusco wrote this incredibly informative response to Joe Scanlan’s ridiculous project in the Whitney Biennial.

This is a good and important essay about art schools and institutional power.